Diabetes insipidus in Cats

This renders the body incapable of regulating the use of water.

Symptoms
These include polydipsia excessive thirst and polyuria production of large amounts of urine.

Causes
Diabetes insipidus is caused by lack of the anti-diuretic hormone ADH produced in the cat’s pituitary glands, or the failure of kidneys to respond to this hormone. Normally, the production of ADH is increased when there is little water intake, and decreased when the cat drinks large quantities of water, thus controlling the body’s water balance.

What to do
Any sign of abnormal water intake should be investigated by a vet as soon as possible.

Treatment
Depending on which form of diabetes inspidus is present, treatment may involve the administration of ADH to the affected cat; this is administered through nasal drops.

Diabetes mellitus sugar diabetes

In this hormonal condition, the cat is unable to control his blood-sugar levels.

Symptoms
Increased appetite, particularly if coupled with other symptoms such as an increase in the amount of urine passed, lethargy, weight loss and maybe cataracts. Very often,

Causes
A lack of insulin produced by the pancreas or an increase in blood- sugar levels hyperglycaemia. It is most common in cats over 8 years of age. Due to the increased levels of progesterone a hormone in the blood during phantom or pseudo pregnancies, unspayed queens are said to be more than three times more susceptible to diabetes mellitus, and obese cats of either sex are also at increased risk.

What to do
Take any cat showing symptoms of diabetes for examination by a vet as soon as possible.

Treatment
Treatment for this condition- is likely to be long-term, as your cat may need regular insulin injections and other treatment, so the costs in terms of both time and money will be fairly high. Typically, you will need to collect and test a sample of urine from your cat every morning to check the glucose levels, calculate the amount of insulin needed and administer it by injection, and feed your cat an extremely regulated high-fibre diet at specific times. Your vet will advise you on all of these matters. In queens, spaying will keep the cat’s condition stable.

Feline Chlamydia infection

Chlamydia consists of infection with Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that causes conjunctivitis.

Symptoms
Conjunctivitis reddened eye and a thick, ocular discharge. Sneezing and a nasal discharge are also common.

Causes
Cats become infected by Chlamydia psittaci which is spread by other infected cats in their bodily discharges.

What to do
Seek urgent veterinary treatment for any eye infection.

Treatment
The vet will prescribe antibiotics, and the whole course must be completed. If feline chlamydial infection is not treated quickly and adequately by a vet, it can infect the gastrointestinal digestive and genital systems of the cat, and may cause reproductive problems in queens.

Feline Diarrhea

Like vomiting, diarrhea is a symptom of an underlying condition and is not an illness in itself.

Symptoms
Pungent, liquid-like faeces; these may be passed frequently, necessitating many trips to the litter tray, or appear as ‘accidents’ around the home. If your cat is suffering from colitis an inflammation of the colon, his faeces will contain quite a lot of mucus and bright red blood. Another symptom of colitis is tenesmus, where the cat strains to defecate; this latter symptom is often mistaken for a symptom of constipation. Diarrhea often leads to dehydration, so your cat may appear slightly disorientated.

Causes
Diarrhea may simply be a symptom of overeating or stress. Intestinal worms are a common cause of diarrhoea, as are foreign bodies in the digestive system and fungal infections.

What to do
Prevent the cat from eating anything, but ensure that he is given adequate amounts of drinking water. If the diarrhoea is acute, provide the cat with a rehydrating fluid and contact the vet. Keep your cat where you can see him, covering the floor with newspapers, or something similar, to keep your home clean. Note the times of his motions, and also the consistency, colour and quantity of the diarrhea. By doing this, you will help the vet to find the cause of the sudden diarrhea, and to treat the problem effectively.

Treatment
The treatment for diarrhea depends upon the underlying cause. If it is due to internal parasites, then anthelmintics wormers will be used to rid the cat of the infestation, while antibiotics will be used for infections. Diarrhoea can cause the cat to dehydrate, and can lead to irreparable body damage particularly of the kidneys and even death. In all cases of severe diarrhea where overeating is not the cause, if it persists, or if there is blood in the motions, consult your vet immediately so the cat can be treated at once.